Course Descriptions

Examinations

Students are expected to take examinations at the scheduled time. The registrar will post a schedule of dates and times for midterm and final examinations each quarter well in advance of the examinations. Students must submit requests for excused absences to the vice president for academic affairs in advance of the date of the examination. Only conflicts created by illness or unavoidable circumstances will be considered.

The Designated Course Numbers

Courses are designated by number to facilitate computerizing credit and grade records, and to provide positive identification.

The first digit identifies the general category of the subject matter:

First Digit General Subject

1 Anatomy

2 Physiology and Chemistry

3 Radiology

4 Pathology, Microbiology and Public Health

5 Research

6 Diagnosis

7 Clinic

8 Philosophy

9 Chiropractic Technique

0 Business Practices

The course numbers serve only for identification and do not necessarily represent the sequence in which courses are offered.

Certain courses are prerequisites for subsequent courses. A student must earn a passing grade in the prerequisite course before proceeding to the subsequent course.

Course Descriptions

Anatomy

Anatomy 101 (Spinal Anatomy) 96 hrs.

This lecture course is a study of the spine from a regional viewpoint, a description of the gross anatomy of the spinal column and the individual vertebrae, and consideration of similarities and differences between the various vertebrae. Classification of the various types of joints of the spine, their articulating surfaces and ligaments are studied in detail as a foundation for future courses in x-ray and adjusting technique. All muscles attaching to and acting on the spine, as well as normal and abnormal postural conditions, are considered. Spinal embryology and anomalies are introduced.

Anatomy 102 (Histology) 60 hrs.

This lecture/demonstration course serves to develop a physiological and anatomical understanding of tissue structure and development from the primary germ tissues of the embryonic stage to the primary tissues of the mature stage. Cellular and tissue structure are shown using the microscope and slide projector. This is a foundation course for future anatomical and physiological courses.

Anatomy 103 (Anatomy I) 84 hrs.

This lecture course covers the gross anatomy, surface anatomy and prenatal development (embryology) of the thoracic, abdominal, pelvic and perineal regions.

Anatomy 104 (Anatomy II) 60 hrs.

This lecture course covers the osteology, musculature, angiology, innervation and surface anatomy of the posterior neck, back, and the upper extremities, as well as the prenatal development (embryology) of the skeletal and muscular systems. (Prerequisite 103)

Anatomy 106 (Anatomy III) 60 hrs.

This lecture course covers the gross anatomy, surface anatomy and prenatal development (embryology) of the head and neck. All systems of the head and neck (except the brain and spinal cord) are discussed. (Prerequisite 103)

Anatomy 111 (Special Senses) 48 hrs.

This lecture/demonstration course is a study of the organs of sight, hearing, taste, smell, touch and equilibrium. The gross and microscopic anatomical structure of these organs is considered, along with their blood supply, neural connections, and biochemical and physiological function. Pathologies of the organs of special sense, their symptoms, course and significance are also studied. (Prerequisites 106,116)

Anatomy 113 (Anatomy Lab I) 48 hrs.

This gross dissection course covers areas discussed in Anatomy 103.

Anatomy 114 (Anatomy Lab II) 36 hrs.

This gross dissection course covers areas discussed in Anatomy 104.

Anatomy 116 (Anatomy Lab III) 24 hrs.

This gross dissection course covers areas discussed in Anatomy 106.

Anatomy 124 (Neuroanatomy I) 60 hrs.

This lecture course is the first of two anatomy courses on the nerve system. It includes an introduction to the nerve system, followed by the study of neurons and fibers, receptors, meninges, cerebrospinal fluid, myelin, segmental innervation, the autonomic nerve system, and the structural and functional anatomy of the spinal cord. Nuclei and tracts are studied at the gross and microscopic levels. Specific reflexes and the effects of certain lesions are also considered. (Prerequisite 103)

Anatomy 125 (Neuroanatomy II) 108 hrs.

This lecture/laboratory (72/36) course is the continuation of Anatomy 124. It covers the structural and functional anatomy of the brain-stem, the cranial nerves, and the forebrain. As in Anatomy 124, nuclei, tracts and the effects of lesions are studied at the gross and microscopic levels. The laboratory portion includes the study of microscopic slides, models and brain dissection. (Prerequisite 124)

Physiology and Chemistry

Physiology 201 (Neurophysiology) 60 hrs.

This in-depth lecture course is concerned with the properties and functions of the central and peripheral nerve system. It examines the physical properties of the nerve impulse, the chemical neurotransmitters, the functions of the different parts of the brain and spinal cord, the neural pathways involved in various brain functions, and the neural control of body functions. (Prerequisites 124, 125)

Physiology 202 (Fluids, Renal and Respiratory Physiology) 60 hrs.

This lecture course covers the functions of the urinary and respiratory systems, fluid regulation and lymphatic circulation.

Physiology 203 (Digestive Physiology and Temperature Regulation) 60 hrs.

This lecture course covers the functions of the digestive system and of the homeothermic processes of temperature regulation. (Prerequisite 201)

Physiology 204 (Endocrine Physiology) 60 hrs.

This comprehensive lecture course covers the human hormonal control systems, the functions of individual hormones and their interactions, and reproductive physiology. (Prerequisite 201 recommended)

Physiology 205 (Cardiovascular Physiology) 60 hrs.

This lecture course covers the functions of the red blood cells, and the functions and dynamics of the heart and cardiovascular circulation. (Prerequisites 201, 202)

Physiology 206 (Physiology Lab) 36 hrs.

This laboratory course demonstrates various techniques used in the testing of many organ systems throughout the body. It enhances the student’s previous knowledge from courses in physiology and laboratory diagnosis and gives them a more comprehensive view of overall metabolism. (Prerequisites 201, 202, 203, 204, 205)

Physiology 210 (Advanced Neurobiology) 60 hrs. Elective

An in-depth study of current and probable future approaches to the understanding of the way the human body operates as an integrated whole in health and in malfunction. (Prerequisites 111, 124, 201, 204)

Chemistry 209 (Nutrition and Deficiency Disorders) 60 hrs.

This lecture course is a study of the major categories of food and their utilization by the body. The chemistry of vitamins and minerals is studied along with their biochemical relationship to enzymes and their overall role in the human body. Nutritional deficiency disorders are discussed, including their origins and prevention. Further consideration is given to the effects of modern preparation, preservation, refining and other environmental influences on the quality of food.

Chemistry 220 (Biochemistry I) 60 hrs.

This lecture course presents the structure and function of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins, and their roles in the metabolic pathways of the human body. Photosynthesis and nutrition are briefly covered.

Chemistry 222 (Biochemistry II) 60 hrs.

This lecture course presents the structure and function of nucleic acids. The role of nucleic acids in the synthesis of proteins and in the expression of the genetic information stored in the chromosomes is discussed. The principles of inheritance and genetic abnormalities are discussed. Nutritional biochemistry is included. (Prerequisite 220)

Radiology

Radiology 301 (X-ray Physics) 60 hrs.

This lecture/demonstration course discusses the uses and dangers of ionizing radiation. An in-depth study of the physics involved in the production of x-rays, their properties, and interactions with matter is presented. X-ray machine operation, developing procedures, and patient safety factors are also covered.

Radiology 302 (Radiographic Anatomy) 60 hrs.

This lecture/laboratory (30/30) course introduces the student to the interpretation of spinal structures as viewed on x-rays (spinographs). Normal spinal structures are thoroughly studied in preparation for other x-ray courses in the curriculum. (Prerequisites 101, 103, 113)

Radiology 304 (X-ray Set-up Procedures I) 48 hrs.

This lecture/laboratory course (12/36) is designed to teach the student those practical procedures necessary to obtain analytical quality x-rays of the cervical spine. The laboratory portion covers both x-ray set-ups and film developing techniques. (Prerequisites 301, 302)

Radiology 306 (X-ray Set-up Procedures II) 24 hrs.

This lecture/laboratory course (4/20) is designed to teach the student those practical procedures necessary to obtain analytical quality x-rays of the full spine. The laboratory portion covers both x-ray set-ups and film developing techniques. (Prerequisites 301, 302)

Radiology 314 (Radiographic Analysis I) 60 hrs.

This lecture/laboratory (24/36) course is designed to instruct the student in visual analysis, line analysis and neural canal studies, and to correlate these with spinal biodynamics and malformations in order to obtain accurate listings of vertebral misalignments in the cervical spine. (Prerequisites 301, 302, 304)

Radiology 316 (Radiographic Analysis II) 60 hrs.

This lecture/laboratory (24/36) course is designed to instruct the student in visual and line analysis studies, and to correlate these with spinal biodynamics and malformations in order to obtain accurate listings of vertebral misalignments in the thoracic and lumbar spine and the pelvis. (Prerequisites 301, 302, 306, 314)

Radiology 320 (Soft Tissue X-ray Pathology) 48 hrs.

This lecture/laboratory (24/24) course deals with the diagnostic interpretation of radiographs of the various systems and organs of the body. It is designed to familiarize the student with diagnostic techniques and procedures involved in patient safety, assessment and referral. (Prerequisites 302, 426, 428)

Radiology 322 (Hard Tissue X-ray Pathology) 84 hrs.

This lecture/laboratory (48/36) course is designed to aid the student in learning to recognize, on x-rays, deviations from norms which constitute possible pathological conditions and/or contraindications for the use of certain chiropractic adjustic techniques. (Prerequisites 304, 306, 314, 316)

Radiology 330 (X-ray Review) 60 hrs.

This lecture/laboratory (30/30) course is designed to review the previous soft and hard tissue x-ray courses. Emphasis is placed on material that may be encountered on a licensing exam. (Prerequisites 320, 322)

Radiology 340 (Blair X-ray Analysis) 48 hrs. Elective

This lecture/demonstration course provides a basic understanding of the Blair concept of occipito-atlanto-axial misalignment. The use of protracto and stereo views is studied. (Prerequisites 304, 306, 314, 316)

Pathology, Microbiology and Public Health

Pathology 401 (Terminology and Principles) 48 hrs.

This lecture course introduces scientific terminology commonly utilized in chiropractic. Latin and Greek prefixes, suffixes and roots are covered with emphasis on practical usage. The principles of morbid anatomy and the application of those principles to a broad overview of pathology are also covered.

Microbiology 420 (Microbiology I) 60 hrs.

This in-depth lecture/laboratory (48/12) course presents modern concepts of the role of bacteria in ecological and biological cycles and the influence of bacteria on the healthy and the disordered body. Immunological concepts and the role of the immune system in disease processes are presented.

Microbiology 422 (Microbiology II) 60 hrs.

This lecture/laboratory (48/12) course is a continuation of Microbiology 420. Emphasis is placed on pathogenic microbes and includes a systematic study of parasites, vectors, fomites, microbial life cycles, and the relationship between common pathogens and their hosts. Laboratory instruction, which stresses the observation and identification of clinically significant microbes, accompanies this course. (Prerequisite 420)

Public Health 424 60 hrs.

This lecture course deals with public health organizations on the jurisdictional level, and with individual and community responsibilities in matters of environmental protection. Food, water and air pollution are considered, as well as the public health ramifications of drugs. (Prerequisite 422 recommended)

Pathology 426 (Tumors and Infectious Diseases) 60 hrs.

This lecture course is a thorough study of benign and malignant neoplasms including their identification, classification, gross and micropathology, clinical and laboratory diagnosis procedures, frequency of occurrence, and indication of onset. The causes, courses, and prevention of venereal diseases, including a study of their effects on the various systems of the body, are covered. The etiology, epidemiology and pathology of tuberculosis and leprosy are also studied.

Pathology 428 (Micropathology) 60 hrs.

This lecture course covers the principles of morbid anatomy, including cellular morphology, inflammatory changes, various types of degeneration, atrophy, necrosis, thrombosis, gangrene, repair and healing, the internal fluid environment, hemorrhage, shock and postmortem changes. (Prerequisite 422)

Pathology 430 (First Aid) 60 hrs.

This lecture/laboratory (30/30) course presents practical instruction in rendering emergency first aid, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

Pathology 432 (Obstetrics and Gynecology) 48 hrs.

This lecture course covers human gestation from conception through parturition. It includes a study of physiological considerations concerning the expectant mother and fetus relative to x-ray, spinal care, preparation for delivery and postnatal care of the infant. The causes of complications during pregnancy, and methods of prevention are studied. A review of the anatomy, physiology and pathology of the female reproductive organs, and changes during puberty and menopause, are also included.

Pathology 434 (Abnormal Psychology) 24 hrs.

This lecture/discussion course is concerned with human personality and traits, both normal and abnormal, in a social environment, with emphasis on the description of psychological disorders. Biological, psychological and social factors are discussed.

Research

Research 503 (Written Communication) 60 hrs. Elective

This lecture course assists students in improving their written communication skills.

Research 504 (Library Resources) 60 hrs. Elective

This lecture/demonstration course instructs students in the efficient use of the library and other information resources. It introduces students to library skills useful in the preparation of professional research projects.

Research 510 (Research Design) 36 hrs.

This lecture course offers the student an introduction to basic research methods. Students are shown how to develop a sound research hypothesis, gather data, and analyze data statistically. Students are assisted in developing a research proposal.

Research 511 (Research Thesis) 60 hrs. Elective

This lecture course builds on Research 510. Students are shown how to organize the data they have collected from their intern experience and present it in an appropriate written form. The purpose of this course is to assist the student in producing a scholarly thesis suitable for publication. (Prerequisite 510)

Research 515 (Senior Research) 300 hrs. Elective

This clinical research course is available in 13th quarter only. Senior Research provides the student an opportunity to participate in or conduct a research project under the supervision of the director of research including data collection, analysis, and the preparation of the written document suitable for publication.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis 601 (Physical Examination I) 48 hrs.

This lecture/laboratory (36/12) course is designed to teach the methods of taking case histories, and performing patient examinations, including the use of the ophthalmoscope, otoscope, sphygmomanometer, stethoscope and other examination aids.

Diagnosis 602 (Orthopedic/Neurological I) 36 hrs.

This lecture/demonstration course is designed to teach procedures used in the orthopedic and neurological examination. Information is presented regarding diseases of the nerve system and procedures used to evaluate sensory, motor and reflex tests, charts, physical signs and symptoms.

Diagnosis 603 (Physical Examination II) 36 hrs.

This lecture/demonstration course is designed to expand the student’s knowledge of physical examination procedures of the cranial nerves, head, neck, rectal, urogenital, gastrointestinal, and gynecological areas.

Diagnosis 606 (Pediatrics/Geriatrics) 60 hrs.

This lecture course is a study of the normal and abnormal changes that occur in the developing child and the aging adult, including consideration of the physical, nutritional and psychological needs of both age groups. Particular emphasis is placed on the special problems involved in chiropractic care of children and the aged.

Diagnosis 607 (Cardiovascular/Renal/Pulmonary) 60 hrs.

This lecture/demonstration course is a study of the pathologies of the heart, blood vessels, kidneys and lungs, and of the diagnosis of diseases of these organs. Physical and laboratory examinations of these systems and the significance of exam findings are a major focus. (Prerequisites 104, 205)

Diagnosis 608 (Laboratory I) 60 hrs.

This lecture/laboratory (40/20) course studies laboratory techniques and the diagnostic significance of laboratory findings in relation to blood and metabolic disturbances. It includes blood cell differentiation and count, coagulation, and other blood values under normal and abnormal conditions. (Prerequisite 205)

Diagnosis 612 (Orthopedic/Neurological II) 48 hrs.

This lecture/demonstration course focuses on advanced orthopedic and neurological examinations. Information is presented regarding diseases of the nerve system and diagnostic procedures used for identifying and classifying them.

Diagnosis 614 (Dermatology/Toxicology) 48 hrs.

This lecture course is a study of deleterious chemical compounds, classifying various poisons by their symptomatology, antidotes and immediate case management. The toxic effects of alcohol, cigarettes, drugs and narcotics are discussed. A study of the anatomy and physiology of the skin, with close attention to common skin disorders and their relationship to other body malfunctions, is included.

Diagnosis 615 (Laboratory II) 60 hrs.

This lecture/laboratory (40/20) course is a continuation of Diagnosis 608, and concentrates on laboratory techniques related to the analysis of blood, urine, feces, sputum and cerebrospinal fluid. It considers normal and abnormal values and the diagnostic significance of the resulting laboratory findings. (Prerequisite 608)

Diagnosis 619 (Clinic Diagnosis Review) 60 hrs.

This comprehensive lecture/laboratory (30/30) course is a complete analytic review and integration of all previously learned clinical arts and sciences. (Prerequisites 601, 602, 603, 612)

Diagnosis 620 (Pelvic and Prostate Examinations) 12 hrs. Elective

This laboratory course is designed to prepare the student to perform pelvic and prostate examinations and to recognize non-chiropractic findings. Proper techniques and positioning, and maintaining patient modesty will be discussed and practiced. (Prerequisites 432, 601, 603)

Clinic

Clinic 700 (Pre-clinic) 60 hrs.

This course prepares the student for their clinic internship. The student receives instruction in correlating and integrating information from the case history, patient examination and x-ray examination into a clinical impression. Health center policies and procedures are covered in detail, and patient record-keeping procedures are explained. Students must successfully complete a comprehensive clinic entrance examination at the end of this course to advance into Clinic 701.

Clinic 701 (Clinic I) 60 hrs.

In this first clinic course, the intern begins to apply information and skills learned in the clinical sciences to the care of other students and their adult family members. Interns gain experience in an actual practice setting, applying their training in analysis, correlation and synthesis by taking case histories, performing examinations, including x-ray and instrumentation, and spinal adjusting. The intern works under the close supervision of licensed clinic faculty doctors.

Clinic 702, 703, 704, 705, 706 (Clinic II, III, IV, V, VI) 480 hrs. total

These clinic courses allow the student intern to continue to apply all the previously learned skills of patient management, x-ray and technique by rendering chiropractic service to patients from the community in addition to student patients. The student intern continues to work under the supervision of licensed doctors of chiropractic and is required to meet the established quarter requirements for each of these clinic courses.

Independent Study 707 (Extern Program) 300 hrs. Elective

While internship provides first-hand clinical experience in the Sherman College Chiropractic Health Center, externship gives the student an added dimension of chiropractic experience through association with a field practitioner in private practice.

Students, who meet eligibility requirements, may choose the externship option during their 13th quarter. Externs are placed with field chiropractors, who serve as extension faculty members in cooperation with the college’s clinical training program. The externship offers an additional avenue to expand/augment the experience gained as an intern on campus. While externing, the student participates in a number of practice areas including technical and office management procedures, according to state licensing laws. Experience opportunities may vary slightly.

Clinic 708 (Clinic VII) 180 hrs.

This is a continuation of previous clinics for students not electing the Extern Program. The student serves an internship in the health center and continues to render chiropractic care to patients under faculty supervision.

Clinic 712 (Senior Intern Program) 300 hrs. Elective

The Senior Intern Program allows senior students who meet the requirements and are approved by the Sherman College Intern Committee to work in a supervisory capacity in the Sherman College Chiropractic Health Center. Duties include assisting lower-quarter interns in case analysis, plan of care and patient management. The senior intern is assigned staff hours and is required to meet with the dean of chiropractic health services bi-weekly. Written reports are required.

Philosophy

Philosophy 810 (Philosophy I) 60 hrs.

This lecture course is a study of the fundamentals of the chiropractic philosophy of Sherman College of Straight Chiropractic. The nature, role and methods of philosophy are reviewed, including the relationship of philosophy to science and art. Emphasis is placed on the investigation of the vitalism as a basis for the major premise of chiropractic. The fundamental assumptions, principles, concepts and terms of chiropractic philosophy are presented. The “Triune of Life” is thoroughly explored, as is the “Simple (safety pin) Cycle” of awareness and adaptation. Special philosophical consideration is given to the relationship between universal intelligence, innate intelligence, innate mind and educated mind.

Philosophy 812 (Philosophy II) 60 hrs.

This lecture course is a continuation of Philosophy 810 (Philosophy I). It covers the principles of the chiropractic profession, as they are derived from chiropractic philosophy and the traditional concept of the “learned profession.” The profession's central area of interest and practice objective, as well as licensure and regulatory parameters, are explored. Vertebral subluxation, as the central issue of chiropractic, is studied extensively, including its definition, what it entails, what it doesn't include, and various other considerations. Issues of chiropractic practice terminology, scope of practice and criteria of patient safety are considered as well. Health enhancement versus disease treatment is discussed as the basis of chiropractic's role in the health care professions. (Prerequisite 810)

Philosophy 814 (Political Perspective) 12 hrs.

This lecture/discussion course provides information about the history of accreditation in the chiropractic profession, national organizations, legislative affairs and the political perspectives involved.

Philosophy 820 (Advanced Philosophic Topics) 12 hrs.

This lecture course addresses advanced philosophic topics in a continuing deductive discussion. Educated mind, brain and intelligence, learning and the philosophic basis for chiropractic communication will be considered. Survival values, the evolution of species and interspecies relationships will be addressed. (Prerequisite 812)

Philosophy 822 (Patient Education) 48 hrs.

This lecture/participation course is designed to study verbal and non-verbal communication. Workshop techniques with instructor and peer critique are utilized to give students practical experience in orienting the public to the principles of straight chiropractic. (Prerequisite 812)

Philosophy 824 (Upper Cervical Rationale) 24 hrs.

This lecture course is an introduction to the evolution of chiropractic research and its objectives. The philosophical and physiological rationale underlying a strong focus on upper cervical subluxation is presented.

Philosophy 830 (Subluxation Theories) 48 hrs.

This lecture/discussion course is concerned with vertebral subluxation and the various hypotheses that have been proposed to support its existence. The course includes a thorough review of both past and present scientific research literature. (Prerequisites 810, 811, 812, 124, 125, 201)

Philosophy 840 (Chiropractic History) 48 hrs.

This lecture course is designed to provide historical information about the scientific, philosophical, clinical, political, sociological and educational development of chiropractic, especially regarding the Palmers, Dr. Lyle Sherman, professional associations, accreditation and legislation. (Prerequisite 812)

Philosophy 842 (Philosophical Applications) 12 hrs.

This course is oriented toward the student intern experience. It includes commentary and discussion concerning the application of chiropractic principles to practice.

Philosophy 844 (Media Communications) 48 hrs.

This lecture/participation course is designed to develop the skills needed to communicate chiropractic principles effectively and accurately, utilizing all forms of media, including newspaper, radio and television. (Prerequisite 822)

Chiropractic Technique

Technique 901 (Toggle/Recoil I) 60 hrs.

This lecture/laboratory (20/40) course begins the development of the muscles, coordinations, and skills required to palpate spinal structures and to perform an adjustic move. It includes personal conditioning of the particular muscle groups necessary for the execution of various adjustic thrusts, digital sensitization exercises, and practice sessions in the fundamentals of palpation. The lecture deals with the history, scope and development of chiropractic techniques.

Technique 902 (Toggle/Recoil II) 60 hrs.

This lecture/laboratory (20/40) course is a continuation of Technique 901, with advanced training in the development of the toggle-recoil mechanism and more advanced palpatory skills. (Prerequisite 901)

Technique 903 (Palpation) 60 hrs.

This lecture/laboratory (12/48) course develops all aspects of the palpatory examination of spinal structures. Emphasis is placed on the identification of hard tissue structures, and motion and muscle palpation methods. An understanding of various listing systems employed in chiropractic is developed through lecture and practical instruction. Complementary analytical procedures, such as spinal balance, are presented. (Prerequisite 902)

Technique 905 (Upper Cervical Contacts) 60 hrs.

This lecture/laboratory (20/40) course covers the toggle/recoil technique for adjusting upper cervical subluxations. This includes positioning of the patients, the chiropractor’s stance, and the contact points used. Correlation of contacts, x-ray findings, and all forms of palpation are discussed. (Prerequisite 903)

Technique 906 (Instrumentation) 60 hrs.

This lecture/laboratory (24/36) course presents the techniques of performing, recording and interpreting thermographic instrumentation readings. Lecture and practical work are conducted in establishing and interpreting neurological interference patterns. (Prerequisite 903)

Technique 907 (Full Spine I) 60 hrs.

This lecture/laboratory (20/40) course introduces the student to full spine and upper cervical adjusting procedures using Gonstead and specific Diversified techniques. (Prerequisite 903)

Technique 909 (Alternative Adjusting) 36 hrs.

This lecture/demonstration course, designed for senior students, offers an exposure to a variety of other adjustic techniques. The course is intended to give the student, who must be in 9th quarter or above, a general understanding of different schools of thought concerning adjustic techniques.

Technique 910 (Full Spine II) 60 hrs.

This lecture/laboratory (20/40) course deals with various specific Thompson and Pierce chiropractic techniques for the adjustment of vertebral subluxations throughout the spinal column. Pelvic misalignments and corrections are also addressed. (Prerequisite 907)

Technique 911 (Atlas Orthogonal) 60 hrs. Elective

This lecture/demonstration course teaches precise x-ray analysis, patient placement using the orthogonal table, and vertebral subluxation correction using the atlas orthogonal instrument adjustic technique. (Prerequisites 310, 312, 903)

Technique 912 (Spinal Biodynamics) 60 hrs.

This lecture course is designed to further the student’s understanding of the spine as an organ, concentrating on the biodynamics of the spine. (Prerequisites 101, 123)

Business Practices

Business Practices 010 (Office Procedures/Practice Management) 72 hrs.

This lecture course is designed to prepare the chiropractic student for the realities of opening and maintaining a successful chiropractic practice. Sound business principles are stressed, with emphasis on building and maintaining a referral practice. Goal setting, planning, obtaining financing, patient management, taxes, insurance, and principles of investment are covered. The practice management portion of this course provides an introduction to the basics of management applicable to chiropractic practice. Students, who must be in 9th quarter or above, develop purpose statements and goals for their practices, build an organization structure to meet their purposes, and learn how to manage by statistics.

Business Practices 011 (Ethics and Jurisprudence) 48 hrs.

This lecture course, designed for 10th quarter students or above, introduces the ethical and legal principles of chiropractic practice. The traditional ethical code of chiropractic practice, as well as the modern aspects of insurance relations, are covered. Legal considerations of chiropractic practice are presented, including malpractice, contracts and business law.

Business Practices 012 (Automated Office Procedures) 60 hrs Elective

This course is designed to instruct students in the computerization of office procedures. Each student is guided through the logic and use of computer software created to record patient information, assist in spinal analysis, and perform the principle business and organizational tasks encountered in a chiropractic office.


Contact Information

Telephone
Local: 864.578.8770
Toll Free: 800.849.8771
FAX
864.599.4860
Address
2020 Springfield Road/PO Box 1452, Spartanburg, SC 29304
Electronic mail
General Information: admissions@sherman.edu
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Last modified: April 20, 1998